Conserve Wildlife Blog

“Essential Life” Exhibit at New Jersey State Museum

January 5th, 2012

 Now through February 19th at the New Jersey State Museum.

Fight or Flight. © Tricia Zimic

“Essential Life,” a new art exhibition at the New Jersey State Museum in Trenton is one artist’s response to the decay of our environment and its impact on the indigenous wild creatures that once lived there.  Tricia Zimic champions these animals, both in her exquisite sculptures and paintings and through her work on an ambitious conservation project on a 2,110-acre site in New Jersey. Zimic creates pieces that are startling and provocative. Through painting, clay, fiberglass, and found objects, she depicts creatures that have been displaced by urban and suburban sprawl: a black bear and its cubs foraging for pizza in the meadowlands, a red wolf traversing a highway or owls inhabiting a metal beam. Zimic offers viewers examples both of animal resourcefulness and population collapse.

Short-eared owl & northern pine snake sculpture. © Tricia Zimic

Tricia Zimic trained at the Parson’s School of Design where she studied with artists including Maurice Sendak and Frank Giorgini. Her ceramic work is installed in public and private collections worldwide. Prior to starting her career in fine arts, the artist worked for many years as an illustrator of young adult books including the iconic Nancy Drew series. Through her current work in narrative art, Zimic seeks to communicate a message of renewal and conservation. We hope you will have the opportunity to view Ms. Zimic’s 35  inspirational sculptures and paintings. The exhibition will run until February 19, 2012, at the New Jersey State Museum, located at 205 West State Street, Trenton, NJ.  Open Tue- Sat. 9 am – 4:45.

 

Tags: , , , ,

Comments are closed.

  • Subscribe!

    Enter your email address to subscribe to the Conserve Wildlife Blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • Support Conserve Wildlife Foundation

    Support our efforts to protect New Jersey’s rarest animals, restore important habitat, and foster pride in New Jersey’s rich wildlife heritage.

    Join - Donate - Adopt a Species
  • Get Connected

  • Recent Comments

 
%d bloggers like this: