Conserve Wildlife Blog

Archive for the ‘Bats’ Category

Fact or Myth? The Ecological Importance of Bats

Tuesday, November 1st, 2022

by Meaghan Lyon, Wildlife Biologist

It’s that time of year again, the days are getting shorter, temperatures are dropping, and creatures of the night are lurking behind shadowy corners. As Halloween approaches one animal comes to the forefront of everyone’s mind – bats.

Bats have been misunderstood by humans for many years and are still among the most persecuted animals on earth. In many parts of the world, bats are killed due to fear or harmful myths that make them seem scary or even dangerous. However, the fact is that bats are one of the most beneficial animals to humans.

Photo Caption: Bats are in the order Chiroptera, meaning “Hand-wing”. This skeleton shows how the wing of bats has a very similar structure to that of the human hand.
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Another Bat Species in Peril

Tuesday, October 11th, 2022

by Meaghan Lyon, Wildlife Biologist

Shortly after the USFWS announced that the Northern long-eared bat was being proposed for uplisting to an endangered species, another announcement regarding the tricolored bat was released.

Tricolored Bats
Photo by Pete Pattavina/USFWS

In mid-September, the tricolored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) was proposed to be listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Based on a thorough review of the species’ status, the Service found that the tricolored bat has declined dramatically across its range. Just as white-nose syndrome has been the cause of population decline for the northern long-eared bat, the tricolored bat has been similarly impacted. An estimated decline of more than 90 percent was found in affected tricolored bat colonies and white-nose syndrome is currently present across 59 percent of the species’ range.

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Federal Uplisting of the Northern Long-eared Bat

Friday, October 7th, 2022

by Meaghan Lyon, Wildlife Biologist

The USFWS recently proposed the uplisting of the Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis) from a threatened to an endangered species. The Northern long-eared bat is in the genus Myotis, identifiable by its small size and long ears. It can be found in forested environments across the northeastern United States and overwintering in caves or mines. This species was first listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 2015.

The Northern Long-eared Bat
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Camera Roll Reveal – Summer Bat Surveys

Tuesday, September 13th, 2022

by Meaghan Lyon

The CWF team chose some of their favorite photos taken during their summer bat surveys to share. Enjoy this visual journey into the field to see what a night of mist net surveys looks like.


The CWF Team, Meaghan Lyon, Leah Wells, and Sherry Tirgrath, deploy the mist net at sunset. The long yellow poles are used to raise the net up to 5 meters high.

Leah extracts a bat from the mist net with the assistance of Meaghan. Sometimes crochet hooks are used to help remove the fine netting from the bat. Thick deerskin gloves are always worn to protect from sharp teeth!

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An Exciting Catch- the Hoary Bat!

Tuesday, August 30th, 2022

By Meaghan Lyon

As mentioned in the previous weeks, there was one special bat that made its way into the top of our net during the 2022 bat field season that left us overjoyed! One juvenile, female hoary bat (Aeorestes cinereus) was captured during our last week of surveying. This is only the second time this bat has been captured at this site in the Pinelands. Even though the hoary bat is not an endangered species, this is a rare capture for our team because the species is generally flies high and our nets only go as high as 5.5 meters. Additionally, the habitat we survey is more suited to the Northern long-eared bat which like densely cluttered forests, whereas the hoary bat typically is found on the edges of open fields.

Biologist Leah Wells holds a hoary bat.
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