Conserve Wildlife Blog

Archive for the ‘Invertebrates’ Category

New Jersey’s Wildlife in the Time of COVID-19 – Part 1

Friday, May 29th, 2020

by David Wheeler

COVID-19 has changed our lives in virtually every possible way over the last few months. Our relationship to wildlife is no different. This three-part series will explore the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and shutdown on wildlife in New Jersey and across the world. Be sure to also check out our podcast on COVID-19 and wildlife.

From my car window, I observed as many red foxes in a recent week as I had seen in the previous year combined. And it wasn’t just fox I was seeing more of. Wild turkeys, raccoons, migratory songbirds – I was seeing them all in greater abundance since the COVID-19 pandemic restricted most of us to our homes for nearly all of our waking hours.

A red fox kit with his mother.
Photo from www.johnentwistlephotography.com
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Backyard Safari:Cricket Combat

Friday, April 17th, 2020

You don’t have to travel far to see amazing wildlife. Our Backyard Safari video series will show you stunning perspectives on wildlife living right in your neighborhood.

Join producer Matt Wozniak for a new adventure each week. This week, Cricket Combat will have you on the edge of your seat. You might not know it, but crickets are fierce fighters! Their pitched one-on-one battles can take place just steps from your back door. 

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Backyard Safari Video Series – The Antlion’s Trap

Wednesday, April 8th, 2020

Adventure awaits just outside your door on a backyard safari!

You don’t have to travel far to see amazing wildlife. Our new Backyard Safari video series will show you stunning perspectives on wildlife living right in your neighborhood.

Join producer Matt Wozniak for a new adventure each week. First up, The Antlion’s Trap gives you an up-close-and-personal look at a mighty predator relentlessly trapping its prey, in a dramatic scene that could take place just about anywhere in New Jersey. Thankfully, that predator happens to be only an inch long! 

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Bass River Students Enhance Pollinator Habitat

Monday, August 13th, 2018
Enriching Learning Experiences while Enhancing Biodiversity

by Ben Wurst, Habitat Program Manager

Sunflower in bloom out front of Bass River Elementary School.

Bass River Elementary is a small school located in Bass River Township, Burlington County. Students and faculty are passionate about protecting wildlife and the habitat that’s required to survive. From headstarting hatching N. diamondback terrapins, composting, and raising monarch caterpillars, they know that hands on education is key to engaging future generations to care about our environment. We knew it would be the perfect place to create a wildflower garden to provide food for nectar feeding insects! (more…)

Frosted Elfin: A Rare Butterfly in New Jersey.

Friday, May 12th, 2017

by: CWF Wildlife Biologist Larissa Smith

The monarch butterfly gets a lot of attention these days, it’s large, showy and easy to spot. My love of butterflies started with my Monarch internship years ago. Monarchs are a great way to get people interested in butterflies of all kinds. Unlike the monarch the Frosted elfin, isn’t all that easy to find. There are four species of butterfly listed as endangered in New Jersey and three listed as threatened in New Jersey.

The Frosted elfins are beautiful in an understated way and approximately an inch in size. They are a NJ threatened species.  It is locally rare and found in isolated populations. Their major food and host plant is (Baptisia tinctoria). Baptisia can be found in dry clearings and open areas often along power-line right of ways and roadsides.

Can you find the Frosted elfin in this photo?

Baptisia with Frosted Elfin May 3, 2017@L.Smith

I went out last week to search for the Frosted elfins. I was lucky to see six adults as it was a windy day and not the best survey conditions. The Frosted elfin is on the left side of the plant hanging upside down. You can see how well they blend in with the environment.

The below photo was taken by ENSP biologist Robert Somes in 2015 while we were out surveying. This photo gives a close up look at the butterfly which had was oviposting eggs on the leaf of the Baptisia.

Frosted Elfin with recently oviposited egg on Baptisia plant@ Robert Somes

Now is a great time of year to see all different species of butterflies. Don’t forget to plant native species  as food, nectar and host plants for butterflies as well as other invertebrate species.

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