Conserve Wildlife Blog

Archive for the ‘Wildlife News’ Category

New Jersey Monthly: The Can-Do Spirit of New Jersey’s Citizen Scientists

Monday, October 28th, 2019

New Jersey Monthly recently highlighted opportunities for local volunteers to help conservation groups protect wildlife and identify threats to natural areas, including our own Amphibian Crossing Project, in their article “The Can-Do Spirit of New Jersey’s Citizen Scientists.”

Citizen science projects are an amazing way for volunteers to contribute to ongoing research projects. By using volunteers scientists are able to extend the data collected for projects, and help more wildlife. The Amphibian Crossing Project is one of the ways CWF works with volunteers to protect imperiled wildlife.

(more…)

Tracking a Duke Farms Eagle

Tuesday, September 17th, 2019
May 25th, 2019. Duke getting fitted with transmitter

A transmitter was placed on a chick from the Duke Farms Eagle Cam nest for the first time this year. This nest cam has been watched by thousands of people over the years and now cam watchers will be able to follow the movements of “Duke” after fledging.

(more…)

New Jersey Bald Eagles Soar to New Highs in 2019

Monday, September 9th, 2019
January 13, 2019, Mercer County Park. NJ D/99banded at Duke Farms in 2014 @Bob Cook

Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ in partnership with the NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Endangered & Nongame Species Program, is releasing results of the 2019 NJ Bald Eagle nesting season.

2019 was a record year for NJ eagles with the highest number of active nests and young fledged in the history of the project.  This year, 238 eagle nests were monitored, of which 189 were active (laid eggs) and 248 young fledged.  This is the highest number of fledges ever, surpassing the previous high of 216 in 2016.

Bald eagle nesting population and young produced in New Jersey, 1982-2019.

We owe the incredible amount of information about NJ eagle success to the NJ Eagle Project nest watchers.  An extremely dedicated group of approximately 85 volunteers monitor nests during the season, recording the important dates and watching for possible issues at nest sites.

This season two eagle cams were available to watch on the CWF website:  one at Duke Farms and another at Mercer County Parks.  The Duke Farms nest produced two chicks, and one was outfitted with a satellite transmitter; the movements of this eagle are on CWF’s Eagletrax website . 

More details on the 2019 nesting season will be available in the annual eagle report to be posted by December.  The report will include individual nest data, state totals, and eagle recoveries and resightings.

CWF partners with PSEG, the Mercer County Park Commission, Mercer County Wildlife Center, and Wildlife Center Friends and Duke Farms to protect bald eagles in New Jersey. Thank you to the Wakefern Food Corp./ShopRite Markets, Wells Fargo, Chemours and the American Eagle Foundation for additional eagle program funding.

Peregrine Falcon Bandings in Jersey City and Union County: The Importance of Banding Chicks

Tuesday, June 4th, 2019

Story by Alison Levine

Two sets of peregrine falcon chicks were recently banded high atop buildings in Elizabeth, Union County, and Jersey City. Biologists from Conserve Wildlife Foundation (CWF) and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s Endangered and Nongame Species Program (ENSP) checked the health and measurements of the falcons, while also placing both United States Geological Service bird bands and state auxiliary bands so the birds can be identified in the future.

NJTV and TAPintoUnion captured the banding in Union County, while News 12 New Jersey and CBS-2 covered the Jersey City banding.

(more…)

HAPPY ENDANGERED SPECIES DAY!

Friday, May 17th, 2019

Story by Alison Levine

The third Friday in May has been a celebration of our nation’s wildlife and wild places since 2006, when the United States Congress established the holiday. There is a special urgency this year as the United Nations recently reported that nearly one million species worldwide are at risk of extinction within decades (read our post about the UN report for more information).

One of the main points the report makes is that humans are dangerously degrading Earth’s ecosystems, the delicate, interconnected webs of life that we all, people and wildlife alike, need to survive.

(more…)