Conserve Wildlife Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Bald Eagles in New Jersey’

CWF’s Eagle Expert Launches New Citizen Science Project

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016
CWF Biologist Larissa Smith Looking for Data from EagleCam Viewers

by Lindsay McNamara, Communications Manager

EagleCam Screenshot 2016

Conserve Wildlife Foundation eagle biologist Larissa Smith has launched a new citizen science project in an effort to learn more about New Jersey’s eagles. We know that many teachers, students and bird lovers watch the wildly popular Duke Farms EagleCam, and now those viewers can help Larissa gather data by participating in the Eagle Food Observation Project.

 

Larissa holding an eagle at a banding last week.

Larissa holding an eagle at a banding last week.

Jim Wright — author of the popular posts about the eagles for Duke Farms’ “Behind the Stone Walls” blog, as well as, “The Bird Watcher” column for The Record — interviewed Larissa Smith in the most recent post on Duke Farms’ blog. In this interview, Larissa explains her latest citizen science project to learn more about the Duke Farms eaglets’ diet.

 

Learn More:

 

Lindsay McNamara is the Communications Manager for Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey.

Introducing Duke Farms’ Bald Eagle E-Book

Thursday, February 25th, 2016
New E-book Provides Everything You Need To Know About The Eagles And Their Celebrated Nest

by Lindsay McNamara, Communications Manager

1 - 1 Eagles 008(1)

We are excited to announce that the new e-book, “Duke Farms’ Bald Eagles,” is now viewable online from any computer or tablet! A collaboration between Conserve Wildlife Foundation and Duke Farms, the free, photo-rich e-book provides everything you need to know about the eagles, their beloved nest, and the new high-definition EagleCam that enables viewers around the world to watch the eagle family at any time of day or night.

 

The e-book was written by Jim Wright, author of the popular posts about the eagles for Duke Farms’ “Behind the Stone Walls” blog, as well as, “The Bird Watcher” column for The Record. CWF Executive Director David Wheeler wrote the e-book foreward. Experts interviewed for the project include CWF’s eagle biologist Larissa Smith and Kathy Clark of New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Endangered and Nongame Species Program.

 

Other chapters feature EagleCam lesson plan winner Diane Cook and the use of EagleCam in the classroom (complete with a link to lesson plans). The e-book also showcases the bald eagle’s All-American comeback in New Jersey and the other at-risk species that nest on Duke Farms’ 2,750-acre property.

 

The e-book — designed by Mimi Sabatino — also features cutting-edge page-turning software (try it with the sound on), links to the EagleCam itself, six videos and more than 30 pertinent webpages. Nature photographer Kevin Watson took all the incredible photographs of the at-risk species that have found a home at Duke Farms.

 

Learn More:

 

df-eagle-e-book

 

The Return of Bald Eagles in New Jersey

Thursday, May 14th, 2015
Conserve Wildlife Foundation Releases New Story Map: “The Return of Bald Eagles in New Jersey”

By: Brian Henderson, GIS Specialist

Bald Eagle Story Map

Today, Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey (CWF) announced the release of “The Return of Bald Eagles in New Jersey” a Story Map that provides a new way to visualize the increasing number of bald eagle pairs nesting in New Jersey over time.

 

For years, CWF has worked closely with the New Jersey Endangered & Nongame Species Program (ENSP) to track and restore the bald eagle population within the state. It has been a rewarding experience for all involved to witness the return of bald eagles to the garden state, and now the public can appreciate the scope of their return as well.

 

The recovery of bald eagles nationally and in New Jersey is fairly well known, but some may not realize that as recently as the mid-80’s there was only a single pair of nesting bald eagles in all of New Jersey. The ban of DDT, combined with restoration efforts by ENSP biologists, resulted in population increases to 23 pairs in 2000, 48 pairs by 2005 and 82 pairs in 2010.

 

In 2014, there were a record 146 active bald eagle pairs nesting in New Jersey. This year, 190 nesting territories are being monitored and currently 88 chicks have been reported at 52 nests; it is still early in the season so we don’t have a count for all nests yet.

 

“The Return of Bald Eagles in New Jersey” Story Map displays the locations of all the known active bald eagle nests in New Jersey from 1985-2014. Users can choose to view the nests active in a single year or over a longer period of time. By choosing a one year interval and beginning in 1985, it’s possible to watch as nests multiply from a single nest in Bear Swamp to densely populating the Delaware Bay coast and spreading across the southern portion of the state and eventually into almost every county of New Jersey. In 2014, the only counties in New Jersey without an active bald eagle nest were Essex and Hudson.

 

The Story Map also highlights “featured” nests, or nests of special significance, including the Duke Farms nest which has been featured on a webcam since 2005 and the Millville nest where a juvenile eagle was fitted with a GPS tracking device in 2014. These featured nests include more information, pictures and links to pages that explore related projects in greater depth.

 

As the bald eagle population has reached record numbers in New Jersey, the raptors have expanded into non-traditional parts of the state, providing more and more people with a chance to glimpse this iconic species. This map highlights the ongoing success of conservation efforts and illustrates that whether you realize it or not, you’re never very far from a bald eagle nest in New Jersey!

 

Learn more:

Brian Henderson is the GIS Specialist for Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey.

 

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