Conserve Wildlife Blog

Posts Tagged ‘CWF’

Conserve Wildlife Foundation Appoints New Executive Director

Friday, October 8th, 2021

The Board of Trustees of Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey (CWF) is pleased to announce the appointment of Liz Silvernail to Executive Director. In this role, Silvernail will guide the organization in its work to preserve rare and at-risk wildlife in New Jersey through field science, habitat restoration, public engagement, and education.

“I am honored to have this opportunity to lead CWF as executive director,” said Silvernail. “With the support of our dedicated and hard-working biologists, the leadership of our board, and the commitment of our supporters and volunteers, we’re ready to take on the daunting challenges facing our rare wildlife and the habitats on which they depend.”

A part of CWF for nearly 12 years, Silvernail was most recently Acting Executive Director. Previously, she was Director of Development where she formed strong corporate and donor partnerships to build organizational capacity and impact. Through her leadership, CWF developed and implemented highly successful STEAM educational programs throughout New Jersey schools as well as the annual Women & Wildlife Awards and a host of outreach initiatives to promote public awareness of at-risk wildlife.

“Liz is uniquely qualified to lead CWF in the implementation of our strategic plan,” stated Steve Neumann, President of the Board of Trustees for CWF. “Her passion for environmental causes, depth of experience, vision and collaborative approach will be instrumental in our partnerships and donor support.”

Silvernail brings over 30 years of non-profit experience to the role. Prior to joining CWF, she championed environmental advocacy for both Scenic Hudson and NJ Keep it Green. A graduate of Boston College, she serves on the board of EarthShare New Jersey and has volunteered with the Garden Club of America, Junior League of Greater Princeton, and Girl Scouts of Eastern Pennsylvania.

Amy Greene of Amy Greene Environmental and a CWF Trustee offered, “Liz’s deep understanding of the organization’s mission, her strong relationship with CWF and NJDEP staff and donors, her commitment to restoring New Jersey’s rare species populations, and her compassion for educating its human inhabitants about the importance of rare species protection makes her a natural to lead CWF to continue to help New Jersey’s most threatened wildlife thrive.”

>> Learn more about Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey

Video: ‘Rare Wildlife Revealed’ brings art, wildlife to audiences around region

Wednesday, May 17th, 2017

 

Conserve Wildlife Foundation’s “Rare Wildlife Revealed: The James Fiorentino Traveling Art Exhibition” can be found at the famed Hiram Blauvelt Museum in Oradell with a free reception this Friday night, May 19 from 6 to 8 PM. Former Governor Tom Kean will join nationally renowned artist James Fiorentino and CWF Executive Director David Wheeler for brief remarks, and guests will also be served refreshments.

The Hiram Blavelt Museum was established in 1957 as a natural history museum to garner support for wildlife conservation. Today, it is one of only five museums in the United States to exclusively display wildlife art. The museum is located at 705 Kinderkamack Road, Oradell, NJ 07649.

This innovative three-year exhibition is spotlighted in a nine-minute video by videographer Ed English focusing on a previous stay at the Studio 7 Fine Art Gallery in Bernardsville. The exhibition has also been featured at D&R Greenway in Princeton, the Mayo Performing Art Center in Morristown, the Flying Fish Brewing Company in Somerdale, the Salmagundi Art Museum in New York City, and the Princeton Environmental Film Festival in Princeton.

Rare Wildlife Revealed will be shown at Hiram Blauvelt Museum through July 30, 2017.

To learn more about hosting a future showing of Rare Wildlife Revealed – whether for an extended exhibition or a single night’s event – please contact Liz Silvernail, CWF Director of Development at 609.292.3707.

Autumn in New Jersey: Why Do Trees Shed Their Leaves?

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

By Kendall Miller

It’s that time of year again. The trees around us, in our yards, on our streets, and in our forests are shedding their leaves with each gentle breeze or strong gust of wind. A dazzling display of colors drew tourists to gaze at our Northeast forests. After the brief but beautiful show, the leaves drift to the ground to litter the forest floor.

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Our red, white, and black oaks, red and sugar maples, american beech, hickory, and cherries and other deciduous trees that dominate New Jersey forests all drop their broad leaves on cue. The few evergreen firs, spruce, and pines that we have hold on to their needle-leaves and contribute to the little greenery we have in the landscape until the following spring. (more…)

That Stunning Autumn Foliage – But Why?

Sunday, October 30th, 2016

By Corrine Henn, Communications Coordinator

While many have been busy mourning the end of summer in anticipation of colder weather and longer nights, the changing leaves outside are indicative of an incredible natural process that too often goes unappreciated – not for its lack of beauty, but the science behind it.

Some years it feels as though we barely get to experience the fall season before we jump into winter, but the fall foliage this year has been a beautiful spectacle so far. Here at CWF, we are suddenly presented with a magnificent backdrop of oranges, reds and yellows in our field work with so many wildlife species in our mountains and forests.

Yet as you go outside to explore and enjoy the season, it might be worth asking, why exactly do leaves change color?

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To put it simply: Trees are preparing for winter.

Throughout the spring and summer months, leaves work overtime to provide and store nutrients for the tree. How? The sun triggers the production of chlorophyll, which is a pigment found inside leaves that gives them their green color. Over the warm months, chlorophyll absorbs sunlight and converts carbon dioxide and water into oxygen and carbohydrates, respectively. This complex process is known as photosynthesis and is vital to the health of the tree.

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As the days shorten and the nights get longer, exposure to the sun is naturally limited and the production of chlorophyll slows considerably, until eventually it is broken down completely. As the chlorophyll is absorbed by the tree for the long winter ahead, other pigments that exist in the leaves become more visible, ultimately exposing the red, orange and yellow hues we see during the fall.

So, the next time you go outside to marvel at the beautiful fall colors, don’t forget to appreciate just how hardworking nature truly is!

Corrine Henn is a communications coordinator for Conserve Wildlife Foundation