Conserve Wildlife Blog

Posts Tagged ‘EagleCam’

NorthJersey.com: NJ’s nest cams deliver action with eagles, falcons, and more

Thursday, April 4th, 2019
Jim Wright, whose “Bird Watcher” column appears twice-weekly in The Record and on NorthJersey.com, shares his favorite places to spot rare and beautiful birds in North Jersey. Video created with Wochit.

Nest cams offer you a peek into the natural world from the comfort of your own phone or computer screen. Jim Wright interviews CWF Executive Director David Wheeler about the cams and why they are such an effective way to connect people to wildlife.

“Viewers feel the drama, the danger, the sibling squabbles, the results of chases for prey, the perils of wind and rain and snow and windblown trees, and of course the joys of a new egg hatching or a bird taking flight for the first time,” Wheeler explains.

CWF has long led the efforts to offer free wildlife webcams, made possible by generous sponsors and partners such as Phillips 66 and Union County Parks, whom CWF partners with on the Union County peregrine falcon cam in Elizabeth.

(more…)

TapINTO.net: Online Cameras Peer into Nests of ‘Rock Star’ New Jersey Predators

Monday, March 18th, 2019

Story by: TapINTO.net

Top: Duke Farms Eagle protects two eggs that are expected to hatch soon.
Photo credit Conserve Wildlife Foundation.
Bottom: Peregrine Falcons in Union County exhibit mating behavior.

Photo credit Union County.

A pair of American Eagles tend to their nest atop an 80-foot Sycamore tree at Duke Farms in Hillsborough, days away from the hatching of two eggs, while the courtship season has begun for a female peregrine falcon nesting on the roof of the historic 17-story Union County Courthouse in downtown Elizabeth.

The predators have achieved “rock star” status in classrooms and homes across the state and the country thanks to video cameras that have been installed on trees and within the nests of the birds by wildlife biologists, with live feeds available online.

(more…)

CWF’s Eagle Expert Launches New Citizen Science Project

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016
CWF Biologist Larissa Smith Looking for Data from EagleCam Viewers

by Lindsay McNamara, Communications Manager

EagleCam Screenshot 2016

Conserve Wildlife Foundation eagle biologist Larissa Smith has launched a new citizen science project in an effort to learn more about New Jersey’s eagles. We know that many teachers, students and bird lovers watch the wildly popular Duke Farms EagleCam, and now those viewers can help Larissa gather data by participating in the Eagle Food Observation Project.

 

Larissa holding an eagle at a banding last week.

Larissa holding an eagle at a banding last week.

Jim Wright — author of the popular posts about the eagles for Duke Farms’ “Behind the Stone Walls” blog, as well as, “The Bird Watcher” column for The Record — interviewed Larissa Smith in the most recent post on Duke Farms’ blog. In this interview, Larissa explains her latest citizen science project to learn more about the Duke Farms eaglets’ diet.

 

Learn More:

 

Lindsay McNamara is the Communications Manager for Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey.

Can’t Get Enough of the Duke Farms EagleCam?

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016
Subscribe to “Behind the Stone Walls” Blog For Multiple EagleCam Updates a Week

by Lindsay McNamara, Communications Manager

Screen Shot by Jim Wright

Screen Shot by Jim Wright

EagleCam enthusiasts! Want to learn as much as you can about the Duke Farms eagles? Be sure to subscribe to the “Behind the Stone Walls” blog. The eagle posts are written by Jim Wright, author of the new Duke Farms’ Bald Eagles e-book and “The Bird Watcher” column for The Record.

 

Posts include beautiful screen shots from the new HD and infrared night vision camera, nest updates, eagle biology, FAQs and more:

Close-up of the first egg this season by Duke Farms.

Close-up of the first egg this season by Duke Farms.

 

Learn More:

 

df-eagle-e-book

 

Lindsay McNamara is the Communications Manager for Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey.

Introducing Duke Farms’ Bald Eagle E-Book

Thursday, February 25th, 2016
New E-book Provides Everything You Need To Know About The Eagles And Their Celebrated Nest

by Lindsay McNamara, Communications Manager

1 - 1 Eagles 008(1)

We are excited to announce that the new e-book, “Duke Farms’ Bald Eagles,” is now viewable online from any computer or tablet! A collaboration between Conserve Wildlife Foundation and Duke Farms, the free, photo-rich e-book provides everything you need to know about the eagles, their beloved nest, and the new high-definition EagleCam that enables viewers around the world to watch the eagle family at any time of day or night.

 

The e-book was written by Jim Wright, author of the popular posts about the eagles for Duke Farms’ “Behind the Stone Walls” blog, as well as, “The Bird Watcher” column for The Record. CWF Executive Director David Wheeler wrote the e-book foreward. Experts interviewed for the project include CWF’s eagle biologist Larissa Smith and Kathy Clark of New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Endangered and Nongame Species Program.

 

Other chapters feature EagleCam lesson plan winner Diane Cook and the use of EagleCam in the classroom (complete with a link to lesson plans). The e-book also showcases the bald eagle’s All-American comeback in New Jersey and the other at-risk species that nest on Duke Farms’ 2,750-acre property.

 

The e-book — designed by Mimi Sabatino — also features cutting-edge page-turning software (try it with the sound on), links to the EagleCam itself, six videos and more than 30 pertinent webpages. Nature photographer Kevin Watson took all the incredible photographs of the at-risk species that have found a home at Duke Farms.

 

Learn More:

 

df-eagle-e-book

 

  • Subscribe!

    Enter your email address to subscribe to the Conserve Wildlife Blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • Support Conserve Wildlife Foundation

    Support our efforts to protect New Jersey’s rarest animals, restore important habitat, and foster pride in New Jersey’s rich wildlife heritage.

    Join - Donate - Adopt a Species
  • Recent Comments