Conserve Wildlife Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Education’

2017 SPECIES ON THE EDGE ART & ESSAY CONTEST AWARD CEREMONY

Tuesday, June 6th, 2017

Fifth graders from across New Jersey recognized for their talent and conservation advocacy

On Thursday, June 1, Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey and sponsors PSEG, New Jersey Education Association, Church & Dwight, GAF, and ShopRite celebrated and recognized the winners of the 2017 Species on the Edge Art & Essay Contest at the NJEA building in Trenton, New Jersey.

 

CWF Founder Linda Tesauro with Middlesex County winner Joanne Bennet

NJEA Executive Director Ed Richardson, CWF Executive Director David Wheeler, and CWF Education Director Stephanie D’Alessio welcomed over 200 students, family members, teachers, and school staff. Mercer County Wildlife Center provided two big brown bats for visitors to admire up close.

 

Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey has created an ESRI Story Map to highlight the contest winners. The Story Map can be accessed here.

Kim Scarborough of PSEG presents award to Atlantic County winner Ethan Mitnick.

 

 

Every year this STEAM-based contest enables 5th grade students to advocate for an endangered or threatened species from New Jersey through a well-researched, creative essay and original art piece. Artwork and essays are submitted from across the state and assembled by county.

Mercer County winner Emma Phelan

 

 

 

 

Our panel of judges, including CWF Senior wildlife biologist Todd Pover, renowned artist James Fiorentino, Species On The Edge founder Linda Tesauro, and PSEG licensing project manager Claudia Rocca, had quite the challenge in admiring and assessing the over 2,500 submissions this year, in the 13th year of the contest.

 

First and second place winners were selected from each of New Jersey’s 21 counties. The winners were presented with certificates during the awards ceremony. In addition to receiving a $50 gift card to ShopRite, each will be invited to a one-of-a-kind opportunity to take an ecotour of Sedge Island. Now members of the Circle of Winners Club, these students will be presented with many cool and exciting opportunities to continue to keep wildlife not only in New Jersey’s future, but theirs as well.

 

2017 SPECIES ON THE EDGE ART & ESSAY CONTEST WINNERS REPRESENTED ON NEW STORY MAP

A Story Map is an interactive map which allows the user to click on icons to see participating schools, winners from each county, and honorable mention entries. Scrolling through the text on the left side changes the content of the points on the map. A click on each map point brings up more information, like the number of classes from each school that submitted an entry. While scrolling through the list of winners, users can even click on the schools’ icons to bring up the students’ names, essays, and artwork.

The format of this story map is simple and easy to use, allowing for an interesting, interactive way to display the hard work of students across New Jersey.

 

Congratulations to all winners! Thank you to all of our sponsors!

 

 

 

 

 

In season for giving, donor helps wildlife supporters double their gifts

Thursday, December 22nd, 2016

DONATIONS TO BENEFIT CWF WILDLIFE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

By Emily Hofmann

Newark 5th-graders enjoy a day at the beach exploring nature as part of CWF’s WILDCHILD Program for underserved youth.

Connecting kids with the natural world around them does wonders for their health and self-esteem, builds leadership skills, and often fosters a love of science at a very young age.

And nothing awakens that environmental awareness like wildlife!

Conserve Wildlife Foundation’s exciting hands-on programs – classroom presentations, field trips, live wildlife, and webcam lessons – teach children about the state’s rare wildlife and the need to protect it. And while some schools can cover the costs of these lessons, far too many can’t afford programs and field trips.

Through December 31, all donations to Conserve Wildlife Foundation to support our education and outreach to under-served schools will be generously matched by the Merrill G. & Emita E. Hastings Foundation. This will greatly strengthen CWF’s ability to provide equitable opportunities for children in at-risk areas to become environmental stewards.

Thanks to that generosity, a donation of $25 will be worth $50, and a donation of $100 will be worth $200.

Learning about the eagles, ospreys, bats, peregrine falcons, butterflies, and other animals that might share their neighborhood engages kids with their environment,” says Liz Silvernail, CWF Director of Development. “Our education helps open children’s eyes to the wonders of wildlife and nature, regardless of whether their school can pay for our programming.”

This holiday season, CWF encourages supporters to give the gift with an enduring legacy for the next generation of scientists!


LEARN MORE:


Emily Hofmann is a Project Coordinator and Education Assistant for Conserve Wildlife Foundation.

Duke Farms’ Tanya Sulikowski Honored for her Conservation Education

Monday, November 21st, 2016

By Mara Cige

Tanya Sulikowski, 2016 Education Award Winner

Tanya Sulikowski, 2016 Education Award Winner

We had the pleasure of interviewing our 2016 Women & Wildlife Education honoree, Tanya Sulikowski, and are pleased to share some excerpts below.

As a Program Manager at Duke Farms, 2016 Women & Wildlife Education Award Winner Tanya Sulikowski works tirelessly to connect New Jersey’s people and wildlife. A champion in environmental education, she hosts hands-on creative projects that include bird banding and monitoring, as well as rain gardens and barrels just to name a few. However, Ms. Sulikowski considers her creation of the Teen Action and Leadership Opportunities for Nature program to be her greatest professional achievement because it inspires urban students to make lifestyle changes that incorporate their newly discovered love of nature. Her reach has extended statewide through her various roles within the Alliance for NJ Environmental Educators, where she currently serves as Vice President. (more…)

Autumn in New Jersey: Why Do Trees Shed Their Leaves?

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

By Kendall Miller

It’s that time of year again. The trees around us, in our yards, on our streets, and in our forests are shedding their leaves with each gentle breeze or strong gust of wind. A dazzling display of colors drew tourists to gaze at our Northeast forests. After the brief but beautiful show, the leaves drift to the ground to litter the forest floor.

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Our red, white, and black oaks, red and sugar maples, american beech, hickory, and cherries and other deciduous trees that dominate New Jersey forests all drop their broad leaves on cue. The few evergreen firs, spruce, and pines that we have hold on to their needle-leaves and contribute to the little greenery we have in the landscape until the following spring. (more…)

That Stunning Autumn Foliage – But Why?

Sunday, October 30th, 2016

By Corrine Henn, Communications Coordinator

While many have been busy mourning the end of summer in anticipation of colder weather and longer nights, the changing leaves outside are indicative of an incredible natural process that too often goes unappreciated – not for its lack of beauty, but the science behind it.

Some years it feels as though we barely get to experience the fall season before we jump into winter, but the fall foliage this year has been a beautiful spectacle so far. Here at CWF, we are suddenly presented with a magnificent backdrop of oranges, reds and yellows in our field work with so many wildlife species in our mountains and forests.

Yet as you go outside to explore and enjoy the season, it might be worth asking, why exactly do leaves change color?

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To put it simply: Trees are preparing for winter.

Throughout the spring and summer months, leaves work overtime to provide and store nutrients for the tree. How? The sun triggers the production of chlorophyll, which is a pigment found inside leaves that gives them their green color. Over the warm months, chlorophyll absorbs sunlight and converts carbon dioxide and water into oxygen and carbohydrates, respectively. This complex process is known as photosynthesis and is vital to the health of the tree.

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As the days shorten and the nights get longer, exposure to the sun is naturally limited and the production of chlorophyll slows considerably, until eventually it is broken down completely. As the chlorophyll is absorbed by the tree for the long winter ahead, other pigments that exist in the leaves become more visible, ultimately exposing the red, orange and yellow hues we see during the fall.

So, the next time you go outside to marvel at the beautiful fall colors, don’t forget to appreciate just how hardworking nature truly is!

Corrine Henn is a communications coordinator for Conserve Wildlife Foundation

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