Conserve Wildlife Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Osprey cam’

Osprey Cam = Fixed!

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014
Osprey Cam at Edwin B. Forsythe NWR is back online!
Thumbs up! Osprey Cam is back online.

Thumbs up! Osprey Cam is back online.

The Osprey Cam inside Edwin B. Forsythe NWR is back online! Yay!! The source of the problem with the camera dying right when the young were ready to fledge, is with the network switch. Apparently it can’t handle the high heat inside the equipment box. Either way it turned off at the worst possible time! This fall/winter we’ll be working on a fix for the problem. We’ll also be looking to enhance the camera experience. Now that the birds are somewhat used to the camera setup, we’re thinking of installing the PTZ camera right off the nest. It’ll give us great close ups of the adults and nestlings! More news to come. For now you can keep an eye our for wintering peregrine falcons, bald eagles and any other birds that might perch on the platform!

Edwin B. Forsythe NWR Osprey Banding

Thursday, June 26th, 2014
Three nestlings produced at the Osprey Cam nest are banded for future tracking!

by Ben Wurst, Habitat Program Manager

In the late afternoon of June 24, 2014, I kicked off the 2014 Osprey Nesting Surveys by banding the three nestings at the Osprey Cam nest. I was joined by Ann Marie Mason Morrison, with Friends of Forsythe NWR, our founding partner with the Osprey Cam, and two U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service interns, Jessie and Kirsten who helped bring out all the equipment needed to the nest (two 20′ ladders).

This is one of the most difficult nests to reach in all of New Jersey! It either takes a boat (at high tide) or two 20′ ladders (at low tide) to cross a 15′ wide ditch on the coastal salt marsh. Anyone who has crossed the ditch can attest to how difficult it is. Now you can watch and see what when into banding these three nestlings. A portion of the video was cut when I was attempting to repair the sound at the camera equipment box. At the same time the nest was cleaned of harmful plastic debris that the birds used as nesting material. A total of 3 balloons and a plastic bag were removed from the nest. The three young were banded with USGS bird bands (1088-04358,59 & 60) for future tracking. Check out a photo that I got of “the runt.” Enjoy!

Osprey Cam update: First egg to 21 days old

Thursday, June 19th, 2014
Young osprey develop so fast!

by Ben Wurst, Habitat Program Manager

First egg was laid on April 19.

First egg was laid on April 19.

They were incubated for 38 days, which is slightly more than the average of 35 days in NJ.

They were incubated for 38 days, which is slightly more than the average of 35 days in NJ.

The first two eggs hatched on May 29th, and the third on June 1.

The first two eggs hatched on May 29th, and the third on June 1.

5-7 days old.

5-7 days old. Sleepy…

Feeding time is non-stop with ospreys!

Feeding time is non-stop with ospreys!

Two weeks old.

Downy and body feathers start to emerge at 14 days old.

Today marks 21 days old (for the oldest two young). They're now very active in the nest and like to check out all the cool nesting material mom & dad used in the nest.

Today marks 21 days old (for the oldest two young). They’re now very active in the nest and like to check out all the cool nesting material mom & dad used in the nest.

Three little hatchlings!

Monday, June 2nd, 2014
Eggs hatch at Osprey Cam nest in Oceanville

by Ben Wurst, Habitat Program Manager

Three eggs have hatched at the Osprey Cam nest at Forsythe NWR in Oceanville.

Three eggs have hatched at the Osprey Cam nest at Forsythe NWR in Oceanville.

It’s been a hectic spring (to say the least). I’ve been swamped with field work since early April. Time has been flying by!!

The osprey pair nesting at the nest with our Osprey Cam on it has successfully hatched three young. The eggs hatched at ~37 days and in the order they were laid. Ospreys exhibit asyncronous hatching, which helps make sure that only the strongest young survive to fledge. In years with a good supply of fish then all young will survive. When there is harsh weather or a lack of prey (fish) then the oldest and strongest will survive, this is often called natural selection. The last two catches, from the male, have been very large white perch. There has been so much food that the young all get their fill. Sometimes the runt won’t get fed right away, but if he peeps a lot and begs for food, then he will get his share too.

Regarding the trash in the nest:

We are watching the plastic in the nest and will take action if necessary to remove it. Our policy is only to act when a bird is in a life threatening situation. Us entering a nest creates disturbance which might cause even more harm (more so when a bird is potentially entangled). Extreme care (and patience) must be taken in these types of situations. Trust us. We’d LOVE to not see the trash in the nest, BUT this is a teachable moment for all who are watching the Osprey Cam. Please share our post on social media and encourage your friends to pick up the next piece of litter they see or to not release balloons! If we all act, then we can all make a difference!

 

 

Battle of the Bags!!

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

by Ben Wurst, Habitat Program Manager

The osprey pair at our Osprey Cam nest has been “decorating” their nest with plastic marine debris. They’re turning out to be hoarders of plastic mesh bags. So far they’ve collected three to use as nesting material. How will this play out? We can’t say for sure but are closely monitoring with the Osprey Cam.

Plastic mesh clam bag in the nest.

The ospreys returned and so did the marine debris.

Yay! Some natural nesting material!!

Yay! Some natural nesting material!!

Too many plastic mesh bags!!

Too many plastic mesh bags!!

They're slowly migrating out of the nest...

They’re slowly migrating out of the nest…