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< January 2020 >

Check out the CWF events and other wildlife and environmental events below.


Sunday, January 5th, 2020

Flying High: New Jersey's Raptors

 

Time & Place

2 PM
Tulpehaking Nature Center

More Information

Web

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Birds of prey have made some of the most dramatic recoveries of any wildlife species here in New Jersey and across the United States. Join Conserve Wildlife Foundation executive director and nature author David Wheeler for an interactive program exploring raptors, learning about their recoveries and some of the places you can encounter these mighty and majestic birds in Mercer County and across the state.

 

Wednesday, January 8th, 2020

Kauffeld’s Calling Frogs Citizen Science Monitoring Project

 

Time & Place

6 PM
Monmouth University, West Long Branch, New Jersey

More Information

Allegra Mitchell | Email | Map

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In 2012, a new species of frog was discovered in Staten Island. Like many amphibians, the Atlantic Coast leopard frog (lithobates kauffeldi, named after the late renowned herpetologist Carl Kauffeld) faces habitat loss, disease, and pollution.

Be part of the discovery! Help biologists locate the Atlantic Coast leopard frog throughout New Jersey. In order to understand the threats facing this species, biologists need your help to find out where it lives.

Learn about this new frog species and its habitat and practice identifying its unique mating call. Training sessions will also discuss threats to amphibian conservation throughout the state. After training, citizen scientists will go out into the field during the mating season in early spring to collect data for a statewide effort to find out where this species lives.

No experience required. Training and data collection materials will be provided. Registration is required, contact Allegra Mitchell to register. Meet at Monmouth University’s Edison Hall (Room 201). Visit www.monmouth.edu/map/ for a campus map.

 

Saturday, January 11th, 2020

Kauffeld’s Calling Frogs Citizen Science Monitoring Project

 

Time & Place

1 PM
Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, Galloway, New Jersey

More Information

Allegra Mitchell | Email | Map

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In 2012, a new species of frog was discovered in Staten Island. Like many amphibians, the Atlantic Coast leopard frog (lithobates kauffeldi, named after the late renowned herpetologist Carl Kauffeld) faces habitat loss, disease, and pollution.

Be part of the discovery! Help biologists locate the Atlantic Coast leopard frog throughout New Jersey. In order to understand the threats facing this species, biologists need your help to find out where it lives.

Learn about this new frog species and its habitat and practice identifying its unique mating call. Training sessions will also discuss threats to amphibian conservation throughout the state. After training, citizen scientists will go out into the field during the mating season in early spring to collect data for a statewide effort to find out where this species lives.

No experience required. Training and data collection materials will be provided. Registration is required, contact Allegra Mitchellto register.

Meet at Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (800 Great Creek Road, Galloway).

 

Thursday, January 16th, 2020

Kauffeld’s Calling Frogs Citizen Science Monitoring Project

 

Time & Place

3:30 PM
Ridge Street School, Newark, New Jersey

More Information

Allegra Mitchell | Email | Map

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Through generous funding from Victoria Foundation and PSEG Foundation, students at Ridge Street School are working with biologists from Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey to gather population data on a new species of frog in Newark.

In 2012, a new species of frog was discovered in Staten Island. Like many amphibians, the Atlantic Coast leopard frog (lithobates kauffeldi, named after the late renowned herpetologist Carl Kauffeld) faces habitat loss, disease, and pollution.

Be part of the discovery! Help biologists locate the Atlantic Coast leopard frog in New Jersey. In order to understand the threats facing this species, biologists need your help to find out where it lives.

Join Ridge Street School students, teachers and parents to learn about this new frog species and its habitat and practice identifying its unique mating call. Training sessions will also discuss threats to amphibian conservation throughout the state. After training, citizen scientists will go out into the field during the mating season in early spring to collect data for a statewide effort to find out where this species lives.

No experience required. Training and data collection materials will be provided. Registration is required, contact Allegra Mitchell to register.

Meet at the Ridge Street School, 735 Ridge Street, Newark, NJ

 

Saturday, January 18th, 2020

Return of the Bald Eagle

 

Time & Place

10 am
Wild Birds Unlimited, 2520 Highway 22 East, Scotch Plains, NJ 07076

More Information

Please RSVP to: wbuscotchplains@gmail.com | 908-233-5004

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Karin and Kevin Buynie share their experiences as Bald Eagle Nest monitors for the NJ Bald Eagle Project. Kevin and Karin will detail the decline and return of Bald Eagles to NJ. The Buynie's have 11 years of experience monitoring eagle nests for the NJ Bald Eagle Project.

https://scotchplains.wbu.com/return-bald-eagle

 

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020

Kauffeld’s Calling Frogs Citizen Science Monitoring Project

 

Time & Place

6 PM
NJ School of Conservation, Sandyston, New Jersey

More Information

Allegra Mitchell | Email | Map

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In 2012, a new species of frog was discovered in Staten Island. Like many amphibians, the Atlantic Coast leopard frog (lithobates kauffeldi, named after the late renowned herpetologist Carl Kauffeld) faces habitat loss, disease, and pollution.

Be part of the discovery! Help biologists locate the Atlantic Coast leopard frog throughout New Jersey. In order to understand the threats facing this species, biologists need your help to find out where it lives.

Learn about this new frog species and its habitat and practice identifying its unique mating call. Training sessions will also discuss threats to amphibian conservation throughout the state. After training, citizen scientists will go out into the field during the mating season in early spring to collect data for a statewide effort to find out where this species lives.

No experience required. Training and data collection materials will be provided. Registration is required, contact Allegra Mitchellto register.

NJ School of Conservation (Long House – the red building on the right with a statue and flag pole out front, please park on the left side of the road by the woods).

 

Events Calendar 

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