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Peregrine falcons are one of only two birds that can be found worldwide, except Antarctica. Can you name the other bird?

 
 

Jersey City Falcon Cam

Welcome to the Jersey City Falcon Cam! Since 2000, state endangered peregrine falcons have nested on a skyscraper rooftop in Jersey City, New Jersey. The cameras are live when the nest is active, from late March to July or August.


 

** For sound, please adjust the volume within the video player. **

Welcome to the home of the Jersey City Falcon Cam – a popular webcam that has captured the annual life cycle of a pair of state endangered Peregrine falcons nesting on a Jersey City skyscraper. This is the 19th season of 24/7 live streaming video, which is the oldest online streaming wildlife focused camera in New Jersey! In 2014, Conserve Wildlife Foundation undertook a fundraising effort to save the Falcon Cam, which was run by the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife's Endangered and Nongame Species Program. We'd like to thank everyone who donated to help keep the Falcon Cam online!! Please consider making a donation to support the Jersey City Falcon Cam.

Above you see two views: one from outside of the nestbox, and one from inside the nestbox. If you have any technical problems, please email Ben Wurst.

Jersey City Falcon Cam Interaction

Jersey City Falcon Cam Interaction

Watch, listen, post photos, and interact with biologists.

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2020 NestBox News

March 31

Unfortunately, not much has changed since our last update. The site remains inactive. We will continue to keep the camera online through April.

March 23

So far there has been little to no activity around the nestbox atop 101 Hudson St. We aren't sure what might have caused the pair to abandon this site. There could be a new bird who is trying to takeover this nest site. We can't imagine the previous pair simply abandoning this suitable nest site to find another, less suitable area. Could the yellow railing have something to do it? That's quite possible, but only right after it was installed. Things that don't move don't really pose threats to birds, so they would get used to the railing and carry on like normal.

During the past two nesting seasons, we saw egg laying occur during the last week in March (one week from today). We will have to continue to watch and see if any birds begin to occupy the site.

March 11

Image of Jersey City Falcon Cam - 3/10/20

We visited 101 Hudson St. yesterday to make changes to the network configuration to get the Falcon Cam back online. While there we also did some maintenance to the nestbox by cleaning out some prey remains and fecal matter, painted a bit of the inside walls, and replaced the front perch. We also cleaned both camera lenses. All looks well atop 101.

The odd thing is that it seemed eerily quiet up there. There were no birds observed and from what we could tell, it looked like none have been around. The nestbox was dirty and there was no fresh scrape. There was a long dead prey item at the entrance to the nestbox which seemed odd. Some are known to cache food items but usually not during non-breeding season. Some fresh prey remains are typical to see at nests during non-breeding season, but there was none around. As we enter the breeding season we hope to see activity pick up...

March 4

Image of BM/17: a 2019 JC fledge is alive and well!BM/17: a 2019 JC fledge is alive and well! Shayna Marchese

We have great news about BM/17, a fledgling from JC last year! She was recently resighted at Liberty State Park. As you may recall (BM/17) was one of two young who were flushed from the roof of the Jersey City eyrie by window washers last summer. Luckily, she was found on the ground the next day and brought to The Raptor Trust for care. A week later BM/17 was reunited with her sibling on the roof at their eyrie.

Shayna Marchese recently captured the photo above of BM/17, who has been hanging out at Liberty State Park this winter. Shayna's photo allows us to identify her by her bands -- black federal band and bi-color state aux. band. This is why banding young birds is such a valuable tool for biologists. We would not know who this bird was without those small leg bands. Thanks so much to Shayna for capturing this photo to confirm that this beautiful young falcon lives on!!

We will be visiting 101 Hudson St. next week to reactivate the JC Falcon Cam. Please stay tuned for more updates.

2013 Nestbox News

2013 Nestbox News

Highlights from the 2013 nesting season at 101 Hudson St. in Jersey City, New Jersey as viewed from the Peregrine falcon webcam.

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2019 NestBox News

2019 NestBox News

In 2019 three young falcons were produced at this nest, which was the first time that this male and female succuessfully raised their own brood of young!!

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2012 Nestbox News

2012 Nestbox News

Highlights from the 2012 nesting season at 101 Hudson St. in Jersey City, New Jersey as viewed from the Peregrine falcon webcam. In collaboration with the NJ Division of Fish & Wildlife’s Endangered and Nongame Species Program

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2016 Nestbox News

2016 Nestbox News

This was somewhat of a depressing season for loyal Falcon Cam viewers. The new pair did produce an egg but failed to incubate it. We believe the male was lost during the beginning of the nesting season and was replaced by another non-banded male.

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2014 Nestbox News

2014 Nestbox News

Check out highlights from the 2014 nesting season when one nestling was fostered into the nest atop 101 Hudson St. in Jersey City.

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2015 Nestbox News

2015 Nestbox News

Highlights from the 15th season of the Jersey City Falcon Cam. There was a turnover in the nestingh pair this year and no young were produced.

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2017 Nestbox News

2017 Nestbox News

This was the first year that 41/AX and her mate successfully fledged young! Of three eggs that were laid in April, one hatched in May. BD/62 fledged in mid-July.

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2018 NestBox News

2018 NestBox News

This year three orphan falcon hatchlings were fostered into the JC Nest. The one eyas produced by this pair was rehabbed and then fostered into another nest off Island Beach State Park.

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LEARN MORE:

CONTACT US:

Liz Silvernail, Director of Development: Email
609.292.3707
-or-
Ben Wurst, Habitat Program Manager: Email

Find Related Info: Peregrine Falcon, Raptors

Attention Educators!

Image of The male Jersey City peregrine falcon.

Introduce Peregrine falcons to your students today! We offer lesson plans to help your students to learn about birds of prey, predator/prey relationships, and much more!

 
 

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