Share | facebook twitter flickr flickr
DonateAdoptExplore

Wildlife Fact:

Immature bald eagles do not acquire the typical white head and tail until they are four to five years of age.

Merrill Creek Eagle Tracking

Follow along with one of our partners, who are also tracking bald eagles that originated from nests in New Jersey!

 

Bald Eagle Project

We help manage the state's population of Bald eagles. In 2014, there were 156 pairs of bald eagles monitored in New Jersey.

Image of Pair of eagles in Northern NJZoom+ Pair of eagles in Northern NJ Kristen Nicholas

New Jersey was once home to more than 20 pairs of nesting Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). As a result of the use of the pesticide DDT, the number of nesting pairs of Bald eagles in the state declined to only one by 1970 and remained at one into the early 1980's. Use of DDT was banned in 1972. That ban combined with restoration efforts by biologists within the NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife'sEndangered and Nongame Species Program (ENSP) acted to increase the number of New Jersey Bald eagles to 146 active pairs in 2014 and 201 young produced.

Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ and ENSP biologists work together to manage and reduce disturbance in eagle habitats, especially around nest sites. Eagles are very sensitive to human disturbance and will abandon their nest sites if people encroach on the area during the nesting season. Education and established viewing areas are important in minimizing disturbance, as are the efforts of project volunteers. Biologists also work to protect habitat in a variety of ways, including working with landowners, land acquisition experts, and through the state's land use regulations.

During the nesting season (late Jan. - July) we host a live web camera (EagleCam) that is situated above a Bald eagle nest inside Duke Farms in Hillsborough, New Jersey.


Bald Eagle Tracking Project

 

** Please be patient, map may take a minute to load all data. **

During the summer of 2014 two juvenile bald eagles were fitted with a GPS tracking device (a wearable backpack). ENSP biologists chose one eagle from Atlantic County (a male) and one from Cumberland County (a female) to be tagged in this telemetry study. The male (blue line), named "Nacote," hatched at a nest near Nacote Creek in Port Republic, and wears a green band with code D/95. The female (red line), named "Millville," is from a nest on the Maurice River; she wears color band E/05.

The data collected will help shed light on the life-cycle of non-breeding eagles and can be used to protect communal roost sites under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act.

How to use features on the map

Each color line depicts where a particular bird has traveled. Blue = male (Nacote). Red = female (Millville). The current location of the bird is indicated by the point or dot on the map. You can click and drag the point to any location on a line to view when the bird was there. You can also use the calendar (top center) to select a particular date and the point will move to where the bird was on that date. Lastly, to change the type of map you're viewing (default is satellite), click on the box on the top right of the map for standard and terrain views.

** Please refresh or reload this webpage to show the most recent data. **


Eagle Tracking News

Nacote

The nest on Nacote Creek is difficult to monitor, so the eagle banding crew was walking into the site without knowing the chick's age with certainty. Mick Valent climbed the 70' tall pine tree, and just as he was going over the rim of the nest, the eagle nestling decided to jump rather than wait to see what happened. He was about 8.5 weeks of age, and his wings were adequate to float him to a soft landing on the salt marsh, where he was easily picked up by Dr. Erica Miller. He was fine, and we proceeded to take the standard measurements before attaching the transmitter. "Nacote" was back in the nest in short order. That was on May 6, and according to the transmitter data, he first moved away from the nest tree on May 22, but he remained within about 1/4 mile for more than one week as he learned flying and landing skills. He made a bold northern movement in late July, and as of mid-September was in Canada.

Image of The male bald eagle nestling in its nest near Port Republic.Zoom+ The male bald eagle nestling in its nest near Port Republic. Mick Valent/ENSPImage of Juvenile male bald eagle (D/95) with GPS transmiter being attached. Zoom+ Juvenile male bald eagle (D/95) with GPS transmiter being attached. Kathy Clark/ENSP
 

Millville

The nest where Millville hatched is on the upper Maurice River, in a tall pine with a beautiful river view. Mick Valent made the climb up as the crew watched from the river, and that's where we confirmed there were three eaglets in the nest. With Mick's approach to the nest, two of the eaglets moved away from his side of the 8-foot wide nest and out of his reach. One eaglet, probably the youngest of the three, remained close enough and became one of our study eagles. She was lowered to the ground where she was measured and fitted with the transmitter. She was about 8.3 weeks of age, perhaps a week behind her siblings. The banding date was May 19, and she remained close to the nest until late July, venturing out to Delaware Bay marshes and back in early August. As of mid-September she remains in southern NJ.

Image of Zoologist Kathy Clark, ENSP and Dr. Erica Miller attach the GPS transmitter to E/05.Zoom+ Zoologist Kathy Clark, ENSP and Dr. Erica Miller attach the GPS transmitter to E/05. John FrinkImage of Three bald eagle nestlings at the Millville nest. May 19, 2014.Zoom+ Three bald eagle nestlings at the Millville nest. May 19, 2014. Mick Valent/ENSP
 

Publications:
Download 2014 Annual Bald Eagle Project Report

2014 Annual Bald Eagle Project Report - 4.8MB
Annual Newsletter for the Bald Eagle Project

Download Bald Eagles Nesting in New Jersey- brochure

Bald Eagles Nesting in New Jersey- brochure - 650.8KB
The Rebound in the Garden State. This brochure gives information on living with eagles as your neighbors and how to be a good eagle watcher.

Download Bald Eagles Nesting in New Jersey- Information for Landowners and Land Managers

Bald Eagles Nesting in New Jersey- Information for Landowners and Land Managers - 644.8KB
This brochure is for propery owners and managers who have eagles nesting on their property and want to learn more about eagle stewardship.

Download 2013 Bald Eagle Project Report

2013 Bald Eagle Project Report - 1.0MB
Annual Newsletter for the Bald Eagle Project

Download Guidelines for Maintenance at Communication Towers that Support Raptor Nests in New Jersey

Guidelines for Maintenance at Communication Towers that Support Raptor Nests in New Jersey - 49.4KB
This publication is meant to be a guide for companies that manage and maintain communication towers in New Jersey that support raptor nests. It offers key points of contact with NJ Fish and Wildlife and CWF and offers information on what to do when you encounter an active osprey or eagle nest throughout the year.

Download Adopt a Species - Bald eagle

Adopt a Species - Bald eagle - 197.5KB
Detailed information about the Bald eagle in New Jersey.

Download 2012 Bald Eagle Project Report

2012 Bald Eagle Project Report - 1.3MB
Annual Newsletter for the Bald Eagle Project

Download 2011 Bald Eagle Project Report

2011 Bald Eagle Project Report - 842.7KB
Annual Newsletter for the Bald Eagle Project

Download 2010 Bald Eagle Project Report

2010 Bald Eagle Project Report - 534.7KB
Annual newsletter for the Bald Eagle Project

Download 2009 Bald Eagle Project Report

2009 Bald Eagle Project Report - 430.8KB
Annual newsletter for the Bald Eagle Project.


Learn More:

Contact Us:

Larissa Smith, Biologist: Email
609.628.0402


Find Related Info: Bald Eagles, Raptors

Events Calendar 

< < Nov 2014 > >
SMTWThFS
1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23
242526272829
30

Adopt a Bald Eagle!

Image of Adopt - Cropped eagle image for use in Widget

Adopt a Bald eagle and help Conserve Widlife Foundation protect this endangered species in New Jersey.

Adopt >>

 

icon Sign up for Email

Don't miss the latest wildlife news from Conserve Wildlife Foundation.

Image of signup email