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Young ospreys only have a 50% chance of reaching adulthood.

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Osprey Cam

Thank you to everyone who has watched and support the Osprey Cam at Edwin B. Forsythe NWR in Oceanville. It streams 24/7 (when there is sufficient power supply) and is powered by solar charged batteries.



The camera you're watching was installed by Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey staff and volunteers in the spring of 2013. It is a high resolution, wireless camera (with sound!) on this osprey nest at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in Oceanville, NJ. The purpose of this camera is to engage the public in osprey protection and to educate them about the challenges to osprey recovery. The live feed is broadcast here 24/7 during the nesting season for ospreys from March through August. Educational content is currently being developed.

The use of this camera will also be used to help identify the breeding pair of ospreys by their leg bands (if they can be read). This information will help us determine their site fidelity, age, and migration routes. It will also be used to gain more useful information on the use of trash as nesting material and its link to their reproductive success. We also plan to develop a detailed installation guide with the tools and resources for other land managers and biologists to install this same type of remote camera system at other locations, which is in the works.

Our goal is to increase awareness and protection of ospreys in New Jersey.

The development of an educational program will help viewers and future conservationists learn about ospreys and the challenges they face in the future. It will focus on osprey identification, habitat preferences, their historic decline (and why they need nesting platforms now), prey availability and links to reproductive success, and how people can help by reducing disturbance and monitoring nest sites.


Nest Cam News:

March 23, 2017

While anxiously awaiting the return of the nesting pair, this past weekend's weather seems to have caused the camera to not come back online. Right now we are unsure of the problem, since the camera is located in the middle of the saltmarsh, access is not so easy... We are planning to visit the nest and camera system next week, with generous transport by USFWS's airboat. In the meantime, we will keep our fingers crossed for the camera to come back online.

Osprey Cam Interaction

This subpage of the Osprey Cam is where viewers can watch, ask questions, and leave comments about ospreys and the camera system.

Osprey Cam FAQ

Here are some "Frequently Asked Questions" to accompany our Osprey Cam.

2013 Nest Cam News

Summary of news from the 2013 Osprey Cam season written by Ben Wurst.

2014 Nest Cam News

News from the 2014 nesting season for ospreys at the Forsythe NWR Osprey Cam.

2015 Nest Cam News

News and insight from the third season of the Forsythe NWR Osprey Cam.

2016 Nest Cam News

News from the 2016 Forsythe NWR Osprey Cam. Three young were produced this year.

Chronology:
  • Summer 2012 - Acquired funding to purchase and install wireless HD camera
  • Fall 2012 - Atlantic white-cedar pole for camera mounting donated by Schairer Brothers Sawmill in Egg Harbor City
  • October 2012 - E.B. Forsythe NWR Wildlife Drive impacted by Hurricane Sandy
  • January 2013 - Camera system designed by JES Hardware Solutions, video hardware installed in Forsythe NWR Visitor's Center, and solar panels prepped for install
  • February 2013 - Solar panels, battery components, data transfer equipment, and camera were installed and wired
  • March 2013 - Live feed began streaming

Learn more:
Multimedia of Ospreys: A Success Story (NJN video): The osprey was listed as endangered in 1974 after DDT and habitat loss decimated the population. The population dropped from 450-500 nesting pairs to only 53. Since the 70s the population has rebounded to historic levels. Here is a video of the New Jersey Osprey Recovery Project.

Ospreys: A Success Story (NJN video)

The osprey was listed as endangered in 1974 after DDT and habitat loss decimated the population. The population dropped from 450-500 nesting pairs to only 53. Since the 70s the population has rebounded to historic levels. Here is a video of the New Jersey Osprey Recovery Project.

CONTACT US:

Ben Wurst, Habitat Program Manager: Email

609.628.2103


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