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Ospreys are an indicator species. The health of their population has implications for the health our coastal ecosystems.

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Barnegat Light Osprey Cam

Our osprey cam was first installed at Forsythe NWR in 2013. In the spring of 2019, we installed a new osprey cam in Barnegat Light.


Welcome to the home of the Barnegat Light Osprey Cam! We decided to pursue the installation of a camera system at this tall nest so that we can share the intimate life of ospreys with everyone from the Long Beach Island region and worldwide. This is the second year for this pair of ospreys at this nest site. Last year they produced two young which were banded for future tracking. As many know, ospreys are an important indicator species and reflect the health of their surrounding habitat. A healthy coastal ecosystem equals a booming shore economy and the ospreys indicate that we're doing a good job of protecting our coastal areas. You can help ospreys by reducing your dependence on single use plastics, eating sustainable/local caught seafood and by not releasing balloons.

Our goal is to increase awareness and protection of ospreys in New Jersey.

NestCam News:

May 6

Image of The suffix of the USGS bird band (49033) allowed us to identify the breeding male at this nest. The suffix of the USGS bird band (49033) allowed us to identify the breeding male at this nest.

As many of you who have watched the cam have seen, both the male and female take turns incubating the eggs. The female does the majority of incubation (and all other nest duties including brooding, shading and feeding young) while the male does 100% of the foraging. Therefore, the success of their nest attempt is largely due to the males ability to find and catch prey, esp. once they have young. The female gets a break from incubating to stretch her wings to feed and preen off the nest (you won't see them feed on the nest until after they have young - this is to avoid attracting any predators). Then the male gets a chance to relax and help incubate their clutch of eggs.

I was so excited to see that the male at this nest was banded! Getting a good snapshot of his band was the first thing that I did with the camera after we got it connected. After reading part of his band number (xxxx-49033) I was able to search for his band in our banding database. He was banded as a nestling on July 12, 2006 at nest 123-A-013 inside Sedge Islands WMA (only 2.61 miles from this nest!). I've banded many young ospreys inside Sedge, but this bird was banded by Tom Virzi, a researcher who was living in NJ and volunteered to survey nests and band young at Sedge for a couple years. I took over for Tom in 2008 and have been surveying nests there since then. I reached out to Tom to let him know and see if he had any photos from his time banding at Sedge, but he hasn't gotten back to me yet. Hopefully he does, b/c we love to see photos and hear stories about young birds after they are re-sighted as adults!!

Image of Ben Wurst geeks out while port forwarding connections to get the osprey cam online.Zoom+ Ben Wurst geeks out while port forwarding connections to get the osprey cam online. photo by Northside Jim

It is rare to get a re-sighting of a live federally banded bird, since most re-sightings are attributed to that bird being found injured or dead. This is mainly because these aluminum leg bands are very hard to read. In 2014 we began to band young ospreys produced on Barnegat Bay nests, called Project RedBand, with an auxiliary or "field readable" red bands, which allow us to gain information on them when they're alive. Just a couple weeks ago we had an intruder come into this nest and we saw that the bird was banded with a red band! We have not been able to confirm the band, but we believe it is 45/C, a young bird that was banded at Sedge in 2014. We hope to see 45/C again to confirm her band.

The one thing I wonder: where did this experienced male, who will be 13 years old this summer, breed before here? BW

April 26

Image of An incubation exchange reveals three eggs! An incubation exchange reveals three eggs!

The pair is now on a full clutch of three eggs! The second was laid early on April 23 and the third egg was laid early this morning. Since ospreys begin incubating after they lay the first egg, this puts hatch watch to begin around Memorial Day weekend (day 36 of egg #1). The length of incubation varies from 36-42 days. At our old osprey cam they tended to incubate for around 40 days. Eggs will hatch in the same order as laid. This is a natural adaptation where in food shortages only the oldest (and strongest) nestlings will survive. Last year this pair produced two young and the male is twelve years old, so he is experienced with finding and catching prey, so hopefully prey is plentiful this summer and all young will survive!

We reached out to the bander of the 12 year old male and have not heard back, but in the next NestCam News, we will share more information about him.

Thank you to The Sandpaper for writing a great story about this new camera system! BW

April 20

Image of The first egg was laid around 10am on April 20. The first egg was laid around 10am on April 20.

After some wet weather overnight, the stream went offline at some point this morning. At around 10am this morning the female laid the first egg! Once the internet speeds improved and the streaming server was reset, we got the stream back online.

We can expect her to lay another egg in 2-3 days. Hatch watch will begin around Memorial Day.

April 17

Image of Our outdoor enclosure which houses electrical equipment for the camera. Zoom+ Our outdoor enclosure which houses electrical equipment for the camera.

Our internet service was finally install on Sunday, April 14th. The day after, we visited the site to finish networking the camera system. Luckily we were able to finish most of the sensitive wiring before a cold front with heavy rain and high winds hit the area. We then moved into a vehicle and connected to the camera to finish setting it up on the local network. While there the birds did not mind our presence at all. This is what's great about ospreys who nest atop a tall pole, like here (the pole is around 35' tall). It gives them space from any kind human activity below and the height of the nest allows them to see everything around them.

Last year was the first year that this nest was occupied and they had two young who banded with help from Atlantic City Electric. The banding was featured in this trailer that we had produced to showcase our work with ospreys in New Jersey.

We expect the female here to lay her first egg anytime now. She hung by the nest all night last night, so that indicates that she is likely to egg an egg in the next 24-48 hours (from our other observations at our former osprey cam). BW

April 4

Image of The new osprey cam installed on the tall nest platform in Barnegat Light. April 5, 2019.The new osprey cam installed on the tall nest platform in Barnegat Light. April 5, 2019.

Thank you to everyone who has watched and supported the Osprey Cam at Edwin B. Forsythe NWR in Oceanville with us over the years! Last year we decided to pursue a new nest for installation of a new camera system after experiencing difficulties with this one. Over the past several months we have been working to build and install the new system at a nest on the bay in Barnegat Light. It was installed during the last week of March and we hope to get it online before the end of the second week in April.

Even though we aren't streaming the Osprey Cam here, it doesn't mean we aren't involved with it. We can be considered as "silent partners" on it. This spring we conducted repairs at the Forsythe Osprey Cam to replace the two Type 24 deep cycle batteries and a PoE network switch. After that, we worked with USFWS IT to make sure the network settings were configured correctly and then helped the Friends of Forsythe get the camera streaming online. We are still working with them to get the audio stream online, since that is still working and an important aspect of sharing the lives of ospreys on the saltmarsh! We are going to help them get a discussion page setup so that people can comment and share photos from the camera like you always could on our website. We will remain involved with this camera to be sure it will stay online for everyone to enjoy! The camera stream can now be viewed from this page via the Friends of Forsythe NWR.

Barnegat Light Osprey Cam Interaction

This subpage of the Osprey Cam is where viewers can watch, ask questions, and leave comments about ospreys and the camera system.

Osprey Cam FAQ

Here are some "Frequently Asked Questions" to accompany our Osprey Cam.

2013 Nest Cam News

Summary of news from the 2013 Osprey Cam season written by Ben Wurst.

2014 Nest Cam News

News from the 2014 nesting season for ospreys at the Forsythe NWR Osprey Cam.

2015 Nest Cam News

News and insight from the third season of the Forsythe NWR Osprey Cam.

2016 Nest Cam News

News from the 2016 Forsythe NWR Osprey Cam. Three young were produced this year.

2017 Nest Cam News

Archives of Nest Cam News for the Osprey Cam located at Forsythe NWR. This year two young successfully fledged.

2018 Nest Cam News

The camera was offline this year due to technical network issues. The nest was still active and produced three young.

Chronology:

2018: This platform was first used in 2018 after being installed many years ago by the Garden Club of LBI. We knew this would be the perfect site for a camera, with access to power and internet. We received a generous grant from the Osprey Foundation to install a new camera at this location in late 2018.

Early 2019: We presented our idea for a nest cam to the Town Council of the Borough of Barnegat Light and they enthusiastically approved.

February: We consulted with an electrian, ITS Electric Service LLC and they helped obtain construction permits and install service for us.

Late-March: Electric service was installed and the camera and associated equipment was attached to the osprey nest platform, after that was repaired by adding a new nest box.


Learn more:
Multimedia of Ospreys: A Success Story (NJN video): The osprey was listed as endangered in 1974 after DDT and habitat loss decimated the population. The population dropped from 450-500 nesting pairs to only 53. Since the 70s the population has rebounded to historic levels. Here is a video of the New Jersey Osprey Recovery Project.

Ospreys: A Success Story (NJN video)

The osprey was listed as endangered in 1974 after DDT and habitat loss decimated the population. The population dropped from 450-500 nesting pairs to only 53. Since the 70s the population has rebounded to historic levels. Here is a video of the New Jersey Osprey Recovery Project.

CONTACT US:

Ben Wurst, Habitat Program Manager: Email


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